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Resource Providers at Oregon Health and Science University

This is a summary list of all resource providers at Oregon Health and Science University . The list includes links to more detailed information, which may also be found using the eagle-i search app.

Aaron Cohen Laboratory

Type: Laboratory

Summary:

Aaron M. Cohen is an an associate professor in OHSU's Department of Medical Informatics and Clinical Epidemiology. His research interests focus on the development and application of text-mining techniques and tools for biomedical researchers. He applies information retrieval and machine learning techniques to scientific literature and databases to help researchers to more effectively use and explore the ever-expanding biomedical literature. Aaron received an M.D. from the University of Michigan, and holds a master's degree in biomedical informatics from OHSU. Current projects include the use of automated classification systems in the process of creating systematic drug reviews, and the development and evaluation of computer assisted biomedical question answering systems.



Adult Clinical and Translational Research Center

Type: Center

Summary:

The CTRC has clinic space in three locations for adult inpatient and outpatient research.



Advanced Computing Center Core Facility

Type: Core Laboratory

Summary:

"The mission of the Advanced Computing Center (ACC) at OHSU is to meet the advanced computing needs of the OHSU research, academic, and administrative community by providing a scalable set of advanced computing services that augment and supplement no-cost core services provided to the OHSU Enterprise by the Information Technology Group."

General services offered include an on call systems and database admin available after hours.



Advanced Imaging Research Center

Type: Core Laboratory

Summary:

The Advanced Imaging Research Center (AIRC) at Oregon Health & Sciences University specializes in generating novel Magnetic Resonance (MR) techniques and technologies for the advancement of biomedical research.

The AIRC at OHSU has as its basic mission the advancement of medical imaging. With this charge it has become a center for cutting-edge research in imaging science. It is a research facility independent of existing departments at OHSU.



Advanced Light Microscopy Core Laboratory

Type: Core Laboratory

Summary:

This lab offers research scientists access to high-end instrumentation for fluorescence microscopy. We offer support with image acquisition, processing, analysis and presentation.



Amanda Vinson Laboratory

Type: Laboratory

Summary:

The Vinson Lab is focused on developing large genotyped and phenotyped pedigrees of rhesus macaques in order to study the genetic basis of complex diseases that severely impact the health of both macaques and humans. These diseases include cardiovascular disease and obesity in humans, and endometriosis and colitis in macaques, among others. To characterize the genetic basis of these diseases, they apply quantitative genetic approaches to estimate the heritability of risk factors for disease, to locate quantitative trait loci (QTLs) that influence these risk factors, and to identify functional genetic variants at identified QTLs. They have a particular interest in genetic effects on chronic inflammation and how these effects contribute to increased cardiovascular risk.

Based on a subset of >750 macaques sampled to date, they have recently demonstrated significant heritability for total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, abdominal circumference, and BMI in a single extended pedigree containing ~1,300 animals spanning 6 generations. Currently, they are working to develop genome-wide genetic data in these pedigreed macaques that will enable a search for QTLs that influence these cardiovascular risk factors, as well as risk factors for other important diseases.



American Association for Women Radiologists

Type: Association



American Association of Critical-Care Nurses

Type: Association

Summary:

AACN is the largest specialty nursing organization in the world, representing the interests of more than 500,000 nurses who are charged with the responsibility of caring for acutely and critically ill patients. The association is dedicated to providing our members with the knowledge and resources necessary to provide optimal care to critically ill patients.



American College of Chest Physicians

Type: Association

Summary:

ACCP Vision: The ACCP is the global leader in providing education in cardiopulmonary, critical care, and sleep medicine to optimize health and advance patient care.

ACCP Mission: To promote the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of chest diseases through education, communication, and research.



Andras Gruber Laboratory

Type: Laboratory

Summary:

Current Research Goals:
To determine the role of contact activation in acute intraluminal thrombus propagation using synthetic vascular grafts in a primate model of thrombosis and hemostasis. If the functionality of the contact system enzyme complex (FXI/FXII/KK/HMWK) is relevant to the pathogenesis of thrombosis, a FXI inhibitor could become the first safe antithrombotic agent.

To characterize the effects of endogenous protein C activation on acute arterial thrombogenesis and hemostasis using rationally engineered recombinant enzymes. A pharmacologically viable protein C activator could help utilize the body's own antithrombotic and antiinflammatory system similar to the way streptokinase and tPA became useful fibrinolysis activators.



Assisted Reproductive Technologies (ART) and Embryonic Stem Cell (ESC) Laboratory

Type: Core Laboratory

Summary:

The Assisted Reproductive Technologies (ART) and Embryonic Stem Cell (ESC) Laboratory provides researchers with nonhuman primate gametes, embryos, follicular cells, embryonic stem cells, and other ART/ESC-related services in support of studies on gamete and follicular development, fertilization and contraception, early embryogenesis, pregnancy initiation, fetal development, stem cell biology, cell-based therapy of human disease, and the creation of disease models in non-human primates.

The Core conducts research projects to investigate new areas of technology for creating or propagating valuable founder animals, including genetically modified and genetically identical monkeys and derivation, characterization, and transplantation of autologous, immunocompatible, pluripotent cells. In addition, the ART/ESC laboratory provides expertise and training in all aspects of the nonhuman primate ARTs and ESCs to scientists around the world.



Beth A. Habecker Laboratory

Type: Laboratory

Summary:

My lab is interested in understanding the changes that occur in the cardiac innervation following ischemia reperfusion (a heart attack). Alterations in the sympathetic innervation of the heart after myocardial infarction can trigger arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. These neuronal changes are not well understood, but blocking cardiac receptors for the neurotransmitter norepinephrine (NE) can help prevent arrhythmias. We are trying to understand the molecular basis for these changes in noradrenergic function, investigating the regulation of neuronal proteins that synthesize, store, and remove NE, and the genes that encode them. We are also examining the induction of neuropeptides in the cardiac innervation following infarction, and how those peptides alter neurotransmission and cardiac function. Finally, we are examining the role of neurotrophins in post-infarct denervation and nerve sprouting. Cardiac nerve sprouting in humans has been directly linked to cardiac pathology and sudden cardiac death. We use a variety of molecular, biochemical, and histological techniques to investigate the regulation of these proteins and genes, using cell lines, primary neuronal cultures, and whole animal studies.



Betsy Ferguson Laboratory

Type: Laboratory

Summary:

The Oregon National Primate Research Center is one of 8 centers in the United States that supports non-human primate breeding and research. Our lab is committed to developing the genetic tools and resources necessary for the improved understanding of macaques, both in domestic breeding facilities and in international field settings. The current focus involves the use of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for sub-species comparisons and for tracking phenotypes unique to certain populations.

We also have extensive medical histories of hundreds of captive rhesus macaques available to us. These records, in combination with the large family pedigrees produced within the breeding colonies, allow us to genetically analyze quantitative traits of interest. Currently we are studying traits commonly found in rhesus macaques, including macular degeneration, resistance to viral diseases, diabetes, as well a variety of behavioral traits. These research efforts involve interactive collaborations with numerous investigators, both at the OHSU and at other universities.



Bill Horton Laboratory

Type: Laboratory

Summary:

We are interested in how bones grow. More precisely, we want to understand the molecular and cellular mechanisms that control mammalian skeletal development, especially those involved in linear bone growth. Skeletal growth is primarily responsible for the final form of adult mammals. This is achieved for most bones through the generation of cartilage models that serve as a templates for bone growth, a process known as endochondral ossification. Once the embryonic bone is formed, endochondral ossification occurs near the ends of bones in so called growth plates .

The growth plate is a dynamic structure with a leading edge where new cells arise through mitosis, intermediate zones where terminally differentiatng cells synthesize matrix and facilitate its maturation into a functional template and a trailing edge where the template is degraded and replaced by bone. The synthesis of template, chondrogenesis, drives this process to a large extent.

A large number of genes must be involved in regulating these events judging from the many inherited human disorders (the chondrodysplasias) manifesting defective bone growth, as well as, the many naturally occurring skeletal mutants in mice and other species. However, there must also be much redundancy considering the many man-made misexpression and knockout mouse mutants that exhibit no abnormalities of skeletal development despite disrupting expression of genes that influence basic cell functions such as mitosis and differentiation. Our goal is to understand what the critical genes are and how they work to control the proliferation, survival and terminal differentiation of growth plate chondrocytes. Our experimental approach utilizes a wide variety of biochemical, molecular genetic, immunologic, molecular biology and cell biology methods. It is hoped our results will provide insight into the fundamental biologic process of growth and also establish a rational basis for new therapies for patients with bone growth disorders.



Bioanalytical Shared Resource/Pharmacokinetics Core Laboratory

Type: Core Laboratory

Summary:

This resource is available at OHSU for the analysis of small molecules such as drugs and drug metabolites, neurotransmitters, fatty acids and biologically active metabolites of fatty acids, steroids, and natural products . The BSR provides open access to a laboratory where users can prepare and analyze their own samples by HPLC, GC/MS or LC/MS on equipment maintained by Core personnel. In addition, samples can be submitted for complete analysis by Core staff and the Director and Associate Director are available for assay development assistance.



Biochemical Genetics Laboratory

Type: Core Laboratory

Summary:

The OHSU Biochemical Genetics Laboratory is dedicated to providing specialized laboratory testing and comprehensive diagnostic evaluation of rare and unusual inherited metabolic diseases. Our expertise includes interpretation of results which requires detailed knowledge of the field by individuals specializing in clinical biochemical genetics.



Biomedical Informatics Program

Type: Core Laboratory

Summary:

The Biomedical Informatics Program (BMIP) provides investigators with state of the art informatics tools and methodologies to support translational researchers. Using a hybrid of collaborative and service approaches, BMIP is continually developing and deploying an array of informatics tools for bench research (bioinformatics), bedside research (clinical research informatics), and translation to practice (medical informatics). BMIP also provides a platform for collaborative and multidisciplinary informatics education and research.

The Biomedical Informatics Program includes two major areas of emphasis:

Translational Bioinformatics - Novel methodology development
Statistical Genetics
Functional Genomics
Clinical Research Informatics
Research Data Warehouse - Using Epic and other clinical data for research
Clinical research data management software
Epic as an interventional tool for research



Biomedical Informatics Shared Resource

Type: Core Laboratory

Summary:

The BMISR provides expertise in data collection and management to clinical researchers. Through effective trial management and innovative data collection, clinical trial efficiency can be improved and high quality data collected for analysis. This automated data collection, storage and reporting reduce data errors and save time and effort during collection and analysis.
Consultation and services are available during every stage of the research process--from grant proposal writing through research data collection, management and analysis. We can provide custom applications for data collection, management and dissemination using a broad array of technologies and tools. We can help with standalone database applications (such as Access), using scannable paper forms, developing web applications, designing database applications, just to name a few.



Biostatistics & Design Program

Type: Center

Summary:

The Biostatistics & Design Program provides biostatistics fee-based support across all of OHSU to basic, clinical and population science researchers who are conducting research at OHSU.



Brian Johnstone Laboratory

Type: Laboratory

Summary:

We are examining cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions and intercellular and intracellular signaling pathways that stem cells use during differentiation. These studies aim to increasing understanding of stem cell differentiation into chondrocytes. We are studying this process in vivo and with mesenchymal progenitor and stem cells of various sources in the in vitro chondrogenesis systems developed by our laboratory.



Casey Eye Institute

Type: Institute

Summary:

At the Casey Eye Institute, every member of our team is dedicated to a single mission: to promote the best possible eye health for you through education, research, clinical leadership and service to the community.

Casey is a world-recognized academic regional eye center that attracts top specialists from around the globe. We are known for developing and utilizing the very latest treatments and technologies.



Center for Coastal Margin Observation and Prediction

Type: Center



Center for Evidence-based Policy

Type: Center

Summary:

The Center for Evidence-based Policy is a national leader in evidence-based decision making and policy design.We work with federal, state and local policymakers in more than 20 states to use high-quality evidence to guide decisions, maximize resources and improve health outcomes.

Established in 2003 by Oregon Governor John Kitzhaber, M.D., the Center works with a wide range of stakeholders to improve public policy through innovation, collaboration, and use of best evidence.

In fulfilling its mission, the Center: identifies existing research relevant to the needs of decision makers in government and nonprofit sectors; works with researchers to conduct original research that provides evidence-based answers to policy questions; facilitates collaborations of like-minded parties interested in using evidence in decision-making; engages diverse and relevant stakeholders in policy development.

The Center continually develops and revises methods to empower government agencies, other organizations and citizens at large to become part of social problem-solving processes. We assist in framing the "key questions" that must be addressed for a solution to be reached.

This is achieved by engaging governmental entities, policymakers, non-profit organizations, private citizens, philanthropies, and researchers through projects that educate and provide training on the use of evidence in policy development and decision-making. Bringing these groups together to build on their similar interests, the Center convenes innovative collaborations and provides participants with decision-making tools needed to address today's policy challenges.



Center for Research on Occupational and Environmental Toxicology

Type: Center



Center for Spatial Systems Biomedicine

Type: Center



Center for Spoken Language Understanding

Type: Center



Charles Allen Laboratory

Type: Laboratory

Summary:

The long-term goal of our research is to understand the functional properties of SCN neurons and how the circadian clock regulates these properties. To reach this goal we are pursuing four lines of research:

Cellular electrophysiology of the suprachiasmatic nucleus

Regulation of retinal input to the SCN

Role of intracellular Ca2+ as a signaling molecule in the circadian system

Characterization of the retinal ganglion cells projecting to the SCN



Charles Meshul Laboratory

Type: Laboratory

Summary:

My laboratory is mainly involved in investigating electron microscopic/immunocytochemical changes in synapses within the brain following various drug treatment procedures or lesions of the nigrostriatal pathway, as a model for Parkinson’s disease (PD), and correlating these findings with functional/protein changes using in vivo microdialysis/westerns and motor behaviors in both rats and mice. Using a new progressive mouse model of PD, by administering increased doses of the toxin, MPTP, we have found that exposure of mice to a socially enriched environment can, after the initiation of the loss of dopamine, slow down or block the neurochemical and motor behavioral deficits due to continued treatment with MPTP. We are currently investigating the therapeutic affects of treadmill exercise in this same progressive MPTP model of PD in both young and aged mice.



Charles Roselli Laboratory

Type: Laboratory

Summary:

My research goal is to obtain an integrated understanding of the steroid-sensitive brain circuitry, neurochemical mechanisms, and the subcellular signaling pathways that mediate the central actions of androgens. A major research focus is the characterization of the aromatase-signaling pathway in neural tissue. Aromatase is a cytochrome P450 enzyme (CYP 19) that catalyzes the conversion of testosterone to estradiol. Although androgens and brain-derived estrogens are believed to act coordinately to regulate brain function, the challenge is to understand the complexity of this interaction at a subcellular, cellular, and systems level. A second research direction in my laboratory aims to understand the cellular mechanism(s) by which herbal preparations inhibit prostate growth and to explore their potential as viable treatments for prostate carcinoma.



Charlie Lopez Laboratory

Type: Laboratory

Summary:

My major research interest is investigating the basic cellular and molecular mechanisms of how tumors form and respond to treatment. By studying how these things work, I hope to find specific molecules that are targets for new cancer treatments. I see patients with gastrointestinal (digestive system) cancers and participate in clinical trials for a variety of gastrointestinal cancers.



Claudio Mello Laboratory

Type: Laboratory

Summary:

Research interests include:
Neuroethology, molecular neuroscience, vocal communication, vocal learning, central auditory processing, learning and memory, neurogenomics, neuronal and synaptic plasticity, activity-dependent gene regulation, avian physiology, comparative neuiroscience, sex steroid actions on the brain and behavior, adult neurogenesis.



Clinical Cytogenetics Laboratory

Type: Core Laboratory

Summary:

"The OHSU Clinical Cytogenetics Laboratory specializes in high-resolution chromosome analysis. Emphasis has consistently focused on the highest quality preparations in order to provide the patient with the most accurate diagnosis."

Certifications: CLIA; CAP; American Board of Medical Genetics; Clinical Cytogenetics; Medical Genetics



Clinical and Translational Research Center

Type: Center

Summary:

The mission of the Clinical and Translational Research Center (CTRC) is to function as the OCTRI 'laboratory for human research' by providing personnel and facilities for patient-based research activities. The CTRC provides nursing services in multiple inpatient and outpatient units.

The CTRC includes multiple units that provide clinical research services to investigators. The CTRC also includes the OCTRI Core Laboratory.



Clinical and Translational Research Center Study Coordination

Type: Center

Summary:

The CTRC Study Coordinator team offers support to adult and pediatric studies, investigator initiated or industry sponsored, across OHSU and the Portland Veterans Administration Medical Centers. Our team is made up of highly motivated, experienced, professional individuals who receive extensive training in regulatory compliance and study coordination. This includes a Pediatric nurse dedicated to coordinating all in-patient and outpatient pediatric studies. CTRC Study Coordinators work collaboratively with investigators to ensure the integrity and success of the research study. When submitting a grant application, include the CTRC Study Coordinator costs in the budget. OCTRI may be able to subsidize -- partially or in full -- the costs of the services for certain investigator-initiated studies.


CTRC Study Coordinator Services

Coordinate adult and pediatric studies
OHSU, VA, and community-based studies
Oversee all study activities per protocol
Recruitment support
Consent and assent (pediatric) participants
Point of care tasks including vitals, phlebotomy, glucose and pregnancy testing
Patient education and compliance checks
Creation of study documents
Survey development and administration
Data extraction, collection, entry, and follow-up
Monitor progress of research activities and prepare reports
Coordinate site and monitor visits
IRB and regulatory compliance



Community & Practice Research Program

Type: Center

Summary:

The Community & Practice Research (CPR) program seeks to work collaboratively with community organizations, health care practices and researchers to study how best to improve the health of Oregonians and the broader American public. Because health and health behaviors are affected by the social and physical environments we live in, community-based research is extremely important - but also complex. Community and provider involvement is important in enabling our translational research programs to develop and conduct scientifically sound, culturally appropriate research with real-world applicability. Our program benefits from existing relationships with many communities and practice networks, and we plan to further expand these efforts.



Cynthia Bethea Laboratory

Type: Laboratory



DNA Sequence Analysis Shared Resource

Type: Core Laboratory

Summary:

We perform DNA sequencing & genomic analysis and RNA/DNA (oligonucleotide) synthesis on a fee-for-service basis. We are happy to consult on your sequence assembly and analysis or other data processing, informatics, and database needs as well.



Daniel Marks Laboratory

Type: Laboratory

Summary:

Our mission is to support all research that may improve the lives of our patients and the quality of the care we provide to them at OHSU Doernbecher Children’s Hospital.



Daniel Werle Practice

Type: Division

Summary:

Inpatient Clinical Practice at OHSU (adult) Hospital.



David H. Farrell Laboratory

Type: Laboratory

Summary:

Gamma-prime fibrinogen is an isoform of the blood clotting factor fibrinogen that is a newly-emerging cardiovacular disease risk factor. This application's long- term goal is to elucidate the genetic regulation of gamma-prime fibrinogen as a foundation for understanding its role in cardiovascular disease.



David Lewinsohn laboratory

Type: Laboratory

Summary:

The Lewinsohn laboratory is focused on understanding the mechanisms by which human CD8+ T cells recognize cell infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the bacteria responsible for tuberculosis. Areas of interest within the laboratory include:

1) Defining the repertoire of immunodominant antigens in Mtb. Here, we have focused on antigens that are presented by classical HLA molecules (HLA-A, B, and C) as well as those presented by non-classical molecules such has HLA-E.

2) Defining the mechanisms by which Mtb-antigens can enter the HLA-I antigen processing pathway. Because Mtb is an organisms normally found within the phagosome (traditionally a HLA-II processing compartment). We are currently focused on the role of the phagosome as a HLA-I processing compartment.

3) Defining the mechanisms by which innate T cells can recognize those cells infected with Mtb. Here, early recognition of these cells might directly limit intracellular replication of Mtb, or might promote the development of an effective adaptive immune response.



David Morton Laboratory

Type: Laboratory

Summary:

My lab is primarily interested in intracellular signaling pathways in the nervous system with a specific focus on the messenger, cyclic GMP. Cyclic GMP has been shown to regulate diverse physiological functions including phototransduction, smooth muscle tone, water balance and ion fluxes and neuronal plasticity. Cyclic GMP is synthesized by the enzyme guanylyl cyclase (GC) of which there are two major families: cytoplasmically localized soluble GCs (sGCs) and membrane associated receptor GCs (rGCs). Activation of these enzymes, and hence an increase in cellular cyclic GMP concentrations, is achieved by two very different mechanisms. Soluble GCs are heterodimeric proteins that bind a heme prosthetic group and can be activated by free radical messengers such as the gas nitric oxide (NO) that can act as both an intra- and inter-cellular messenger. Receptor GCs, by contrast, are activated by extracellular ligands - usually peptide hormones - by binding to the extracellular portion of the protein.

We have been using an insect, Manduca sexta, for several years as a model for cyclic GMP function and have shown that a neuropeptide, eclosion hormone, elevates cyclic GMP in a neurohemal organ associated with the nervous system. As part of our efforts to elucidate the pathway by which eclosion hormone elevates cyclic GMP we have cloned several different GCs from the CNS of Manduca. In addition to examples of both classic sGCs and rGCs we have also cloned two novel GCs, which don't fit into the usual classification. One of these, MsGC-b3, is closely related to NO-sensitive heterodimeric sGCs, but we have shown that it does not need to form a heterodimer to synthesize cyclic GMP and is insensitive to NO. The other novel GC, MsGC-I, is most closely related to rGCs, but lacks an extracellular ligand-binding domain and hence cannot be activated by extracellular hormones. Our current research is aimed at understanding the regulation and function of these novel signal transduction enzymes.

Recently, we have also begun to use two new model systems, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, to study GC function and regulation. The published sequence of the C. elegans genome reveals that it has 7 sGCs, yet no NO synthase, suggesting that it cannot use this messenger to activate cGMP production. The Drosophila genome also contains several novel GCs including one that is likely to be the homologue of MsGC-b3. By using genetic manipulations in these organisms we hope to understand how this novel signaling pathway is regulated and what physiological functions it serves.



Department of Anesthesiology & Perioperative Medicine

Type: Academic Department



Department of Behavioral Neuroscience

Type: Academic Department



Department of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, Oregon Health & Science University

Type: Academic Department



Department of Biomedical Engineering

Type: Academic Department



Department of Cell & Developmental Biology

Type: Academic Department



Department of Comparative Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University

Type: Department



Department of Dermatology, Oregon Health & Science University

Type: Academic Department



Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Oregon Health & Science University

Type: Department



Department of Integrative Biosciences

Type: Academic Department



Department of Medical Informatics & Clinical Epidemiology, Oregon Health & Science University

Type: Academic Department



Department of Molecular & Medical Genetics, Oregon Health & Science University

Type: Academic Department

Summary:

The areas of research and teaching in the department include molecular genetics, molecular biology, somatic cell genetics, cytogenetics, molecular cytogenetics, population genetics, biochemical genetics, and stem cell function. Examples of ongoing projects include genome stability in cancer and inherited diseases, gene therapy, human genomics, and epigenetics in cancer. Clinical activities include children with defects, cancer genetics and practical genetics.



Department of Molecular Microbiology & Immunology

Type: Academic Department

Summary:

MMI faculty are strongly committed to providing excellent research training for PhD and MD/PhD students and to preparing them for successful careers as faculty and as researchers in health-science companies. The results of this commitment are evident. Our graduates obtain postdoctoral fellowships in prestigious labs across the country; our former postdoctoral fellows hold faculty positions at numerous universities and institutes with high research visibility. Some hold high level positions in companies. The training environment is excellent. Several seminar series on campus expose students to additional research approaches and philosphies and provide opportunities for students to meet researchers at the forefront of their fields. From the beginning of graduate school, each student is assigned a faculty committee which monitors the student's research progress and provides counsel to the student until completion of his/her thesis project. Students rotate in three research labs in the first three quarters of graduate school. This experience allows the students to experience a variety of research opportunities and to help them choose a mentor for their graduate thesis work. In addition to didactic coursework, which take approximately 1.5 years to complete, students participate in journal clubs and present their research results in a formal seminar setting every year. They are taught to think critically and independently and to write manuscripts and proposals in the NIH style. All MMI students are fully supported by stipends from NIH training grants or from grants held by their mentors. Students often take less than five years to obtain their PhD degree (a little less for MD/PhD students).



Department of Neurology

Type: Academic Department

Summary:

The OHSU Department of Neurology is one of the nation’s leading neurologic research and training programs and provides the most comprehensive care of neurologic illnesses in the Pacific Northwest. We have subspecialty centers that offer specialized care for patients with a range of neurologic diseases including Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias, Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, multiple sclerosis, stroke, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, neuromuscular diseases, epilepsy and brain tumors.



Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology

Type: Academic Department



Department of Orthopaedics & Rehabilitation

Type: Academic Department

Summary:

Physical Location:
Sam Jackson Hall, Suite 2360
3181 SW Sam Jackson Park Road
Portland, OR 97239

Fax: 503 494-5050



Department of Pathology

Type: Academic Department



Department of Pediatrics, Oregon Health & Science University

Type: Academic Department

Summary:

Our mission is to support all research that may improve the lives of our patients and the quality of the care we provide to them at OHSU Doernbecher Children’s Hospital.



Department of Physiology & Pharmacology

Type: Academic Department



Department of Public Health & Preventive Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University

Type: Academic Department

Summary:

We are the primary unit within the Oregon Health & Science University School of Medicine that provides education, research and collaboration directed at improving the health of the community.



Detlev Boison Laboratory

Type: Laboratory

Summary:

The focus of the Boison laboratory is the brain’s endogenous anticonvulsant and neuroprotectant adenosine. They try to understand how adenosine function and dysfunction contributes to normal and pathological brain function, respectively, and to translate these findings into novel therapeutic approaches. They study adenosine-related physiological and pathophysiological mechanisms in rodent models of disease and in mice with engineered mutations in adenosine metabolism or signaling. Bioengineered polymers, stem cell therapies, and gene therapies are used to afford therapeutic augmentation of the adenosine system. They apply these tools to study disease mechanisms and treatment options in epilepsy, traumatic brain injury, stroke, and schizophrenia.



Division of Animal Resources

Type: Division



Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery

Type: Division



Division of Environmental and Biomolecular Systems

Type: Division



Division of Gynecologic Oncology

Type: Division



Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine

Type: Division

Summary:

The Maternal-Fetal Medicine Division is committed to developing and maintaining a Center of Excellence by providing the highest quality high-risk obstetrical care in a patient-centered environment, while contributing to the academic environment through research and teaching.

Appointments: 503 418-4200
Academic affairs: 503 494-2101



Division of Neuroscience

Type: Division

Summary:

The Division of Neuroscience at the ONPRC conducts research aimed at identifying and defining fundamental aspects of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying nervous system function. The guiding principle of these research efforts is the concept that our nonhuman primate resource can be best utilized by implementing a "vertical integration" approach in which studies are first conducted in laboratory animals and then in nonhuman primates to fully exploit the translational value of basic research. The Division is focused on the fields of Developmental Neuroscience and Neuroendocrinology, with special emphasis on Neurodevelopmental and Neurodegenerative disorders. Programs aimed at understanding the neurobiology of aging and mental illness, and at unveiling the neurogenetic underpinnings of complex behaviors add diversity and strength to these central themes. The major long-term goals of the division include efforts to develop unique primate models to understand and develop interventions for selected human diseases. A significant number of research programs employ genetic approaches and genetic models to study nervous system function. A variety of modern genomics tools and bioinformatics strategies are available to our researchers via both ONPRC-sponsored projects and OHSU-based new genomics facilities. The Division is one of the founding members of the recently created OHSU Brain Institute, and is a strong advocate for interdisciplinary research in basic and clinical neurosciences.

In addition to its investigative activities, the Division of Neuroscience provides specialized research training to graduate students, postdoctoral research fellows, and visiting scientists. Its faculty members hold appointments in, and actively contribute to the OHSU Neuroscience, Behavioral Neuroscience and Molecular and Cellular Biosciences graduate programs. Finally, the Division serves as a regional, national and international resource for integrative neuroscience research because of its unique capabilities to conceptually and experimentally link neural functions of evolutionary less advanced mammalian species with those particular to nonhuman and human primates.

The Division is currently composed of 14 Core Scientists (salary support from the ONPRC) with primary appointments in Neuroscience, nine Staff Scientists and six Affiliate Scientists (not receiving salary support from the ONPRC). Altogether, they bring more than $8 million/year in grants to the ONPRC and OHSU.



Division of Pathobiology & Immunology

Type: Division



Division of Pediatric Metabolic Disorders

Type: Division



Division of Pediatric Nephrology

Type: Division



Division of Reproductive and Developmental Sciences

Type: Division

Summary:

Research in the Division of Reproductive Sciences focuses on understanding the neural and hormonal mechanisms controlling reproductive function, primarily in females. Projects span the continuum of reproduction that begins with egg/sperm development, and ends with birth and the nursing of offspring. Division scientists are conducting basic research that will underlie advances in the search for the next generation of specific, reliable contraceptives, novel treatments of infertility, and therapeutics for disorders associated with pregnancy and perinatal health.

Scientists are testing selective steroid receptor modulators and other factors that may control events prior to fertilization, including oocyte maturation, ovulation and gamete transport in the reproductive tract. Other researchers are investigating the function of the ovary in its post-ovulatory phase, the formation of the endometrial tissue essential for initiation and maintenance of intra-uterine pregnancy, and the factors that cause many women to go into early labor and deliver babies of low birth weight who are at risk for health problems. Still other laboratory teams are studying the brain's role in reproductive processes and unraveling the interaction between the hypothalamus in the brain and the pituitary gland that controls fertility.

The division also includes a unique research-oriented assisted reproductive technology (ART) program using nonhuman primates. This program has produced several world "firsts" in monkey reproduction. Recently, primate embryonic stem cells (ESCs) were produced by reprogramming monkey fibroblasts using somatic cell nuclear transfer into enucleated eggs and culturing cells from resulting blastocysts. This method offers potential for generating immunologically acceptable ESCs for individual animals (and ultimately patients if applicable to humans), which can be evaluated for differentiation into various cell types for treatment of many diseases characterized by loss of cells or cell function (e.g., diabetes, heart failure, neurodegenerative disorders).

Most recently, methods were validated for transfer of the meiotic spindle (with its attached chromosomes, and hence all nuclear genes) from a mature primate egg, to another enucleated egg, followed by successful fertilization, pregnancy and healthy offspring. This techniques would provide a valuable option for preventing the transmission of mitochondrial DNA mutations from the mother, since spindle transfer leaves behind the mitochondria in the cytoplasm. Thus, the offspring following ART would be free of risk of maternal mutations in mitochondrial DNA, but still be the authentic biologic child of the parents. Mitochondrial DNA mutations result in several human diseases that are currently incurable. Spindle transfer, if replicated and proven safe in studies on human eggs, could provide a cure."

"The division, in combination with researchers in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at OHSU, is the only program that includes a Specialized Cooperative Center Program in Reproduction and Infertility Research (SCCPIR) and a Contraceptive Development Research Center (CDRC), both sponsored by the NIH, NICHD. Investigative efforts in the centers use nonhuman primates in translational studies seeking to understand the neurologic, endocrine and local mechanisms controlling fertility during the menstrual cycle and to develop novel therapies for treating infertility or to prevent pregnancy in women. Most recently, division scientists joined a NIH-supported consortium of biophysical, biological and clinical researchers to begin an oncofertility program designed to generate therapies for maintaining or restoring fertility in women undergoing treatment for cancer. Division scientists collaborate with research-oriented pharmaceutical companies in these efforts, and actively train the next generation of researchers in women's health through national and international programs.



Division of Urogynecology and Reconstructive Pelvic Surgery

Type: Division



Doernbecher Children's Hospital

Type: Hospital

Summary:

As Oregon's only academic medical center, OHSU Doernbecher Children's Hospital provides an extensive range of services from everyday healthcare needs to the most complex and highly sophisticated treatments and procedures.



Doris Kretzschmar Laboratory

Type: Laboratory

Summary:

To analyze our "neurodegenerative" flies, we are using diverse imaging techniques ranging from live cell imaging to electron microscopy, in addition to molecular and behavioral assays.



Duke University

Type: University



Eilis Boudreau laboratory

Type: Laboratory

Summary:

Eilis A. Boudreau is an assistant professor in OHSU’s Department of Medical Informatics and Clinical Epidemiology. She also holds appointments in OHSU’s Department of Neurology and at the Portland VA Medical Center as a staff physician working in the sleep medicine and epilepsy programs. She studies sleep and circadian rhythm influences on the development of alcoholism using imaging techniques such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and optical microangiography. She holds a Ph.D. in Biophysics from Syracuse University and an MD from the SUNY Health Science University at Syracuse.



Electron Microscropy Core

Type: Core Laboratory

Summary:

Access to EM Core equipment and services is available to all researchers at OHSU. We also provide EM services to non-OHSU institutions and individuals. Our intention is to make services available at reasonable rates. To maximize our time and to minimize costs, researchers may participate in sample preparation, sectioning, and/or EM viewing steps. Training for equipment usage is provided at an hourly rate, and individuals can schedule access to equipment after they are trained. We invite anyone interested in using EM approaches for pilot projects, or ongoing investigations to consult with us on their needs, protocols, services, and cost estimates.



Electronics and Instrumentation Design Core Resource

Type: Core Laboratory

Summary:

The Electronics & Instrument Design Core Resource provides hands-on design and fabrication of specialized equipment for research projects. Projects involve analog and digital electronics design, microcontroller, software development and optical and embedded processor design. The core director, John Hunt, MSEE, is a senior research engineer and instructor in the Department of Biomedical Engineering, OHSU School of Medicine. OHSU School of Medicine. He has worked as a research engineer at OGI/OHSU since 1980 and has developed equipment for many research projects and departments.



Endocrine Technology Support Core Laboratory

Type: Core Laboratory

Summary:

The Endocrine Technology Support Core Lab (ETSL) has provided intra- and extramural investigators with analysis of protein and steroid content in blood, as well as in biological tissues and fluids for more than 3 decades.
Principal support functions include provision of routine assays (for most naturally occurring steroid and protein hormones involved in the regulation of reproduction, metabolism, and the central nervous system) and development of new assays (e.g., Multiplex platforms for cytokines and signaling molecules).



Flow Cytometry Shared Resource

Type: Core Laboratory

Summary:

The OHSU Flow Cytometry Shared Resource (FCSR) has operated as a core resource for OHSU Knight Cancer Institute members since 1996 and provides advanced flow cytometry instrumentation, technical expertise and technical services. The FCSR also provides training in data interpretation, experiment design and routine operation to researchers, offering an additional cost-saving option of doing some of the work themselves. Finally, this resource saves valuable investigator time by analyzing specimens and preparing them, if needed.



Gene Profiling Shared Resource Core Laboratory

Type: Core Laboratory

Summary:

The OHSU Gene Profiling Shared Resource (formerly the Gene Microarray Shared Resource) functions as a full-service genomics facility serving research scientists and clinicians with services for RNA expression profiling and DNA variation analysis on two microarray platforms, Affymetrix and Illumina and on Applied Biosystems QuantStudio real-time PCR system. We are also now able to provide expression profiling and genome analysis services using Ion Torrent PGM sequencer. Support for RNA isolation and RNA/DNA quality assessment also available.



Glenn Woodworth Laboratory

Type: Laboratory

Summary:

Educational and clinical informatics projects for the Department of Anesthesiology & Perioperative Medicine at OHSU.



Haesun Park Laboratory

Type: Laboratory

Summary:

AIDS vaccine development, HIV/SIV pathogenesis



Harlan Laboratories

Type: Laboratory



Henrique Von Gersdorff Laboratory

Type: Laboratory



Henryk Urbanski Laboratory

Type: Laboratory

Summary:

Research in Dr. Urbanski's laboratory is focused on two major hypothalamic neural circuits: (1) those responsible for maintaining rhythmic biological functions (e.g., circadian hormone rhythms and the sleep-wake cycle), and (2) those responsible for maintaining normal reproductive function (e.g., puberty, ovulation, and menopause). His primary goal is to elucidate the molecular and cellular mechanisms that underlie these physiological functions, and to understand how they are influenced by various hormones and by changes in the external environment.



Histopathology Shared Resource

Type: Core Laboratory

Summary:

The Histopathology Shared Resource is a College of American Pathologists (CAP) certified and Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA) accredited core facility that provides investigators with tissue-based services fundamental to the progress of basic, translational and clinical research.

The mission the Histopathology Shared Resource (HSR) is to:

1. Provide investigators with histology services critical for the progress of biomedical research involving studies on research animal and human tissues These services include cryostat sectioning, paraffin- embedding, cell pellet and cytospin preparation, microtome-sectioning, histochemical staining and immunohistochemistry.

2. Provide investigators with consultation and education in regard to best use of histopathology services research protocols, safety issues, and IRB application.



Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Type: Institute



Imaging and Morphology Support Core Laboratory

Type: Core Laboratory

Summary:

The Imaging and Morphology Support Core of the ONPRC is designed to meet the imaging needs of ONPRC scientists and of the OHSU scientific community by providing state-of-the-art facilities, expertise, assistance and training in the use of advanced light microscopy, image analysis, processing and printing, and laser capture microdissection. Special emphasis is placed on quantitative evaluation of imaging experiments using both stereology and automated image analysis.



Immuno Electron Microscopy Core

Type: Core Laboratory

Summary:

Imaging center has an excellent physical facility for handling samples for light or electron microscopy. We have a unique Multi-suite dissection, sectioning, and embedding area. This area is equipped with fume hood, two refrigerators, -80 freezer, tissue processors, and surgical instruments. Tissues of interest may be prepared ranging from fresh frozen for fluorescence microscopy to embedding in plastic for electron microscopy. We have or have access to; cryostats, paraffin microtomes, vibratomes, and ultramicrotomes.

The EM core is experienced in many specialized electron microcopy techniques. These include immunogold labeling, negative staining.

We have two FEI transmission electron microscopes, a Morgagni, and a Techni 12, both with AMT digital cameras for micrograph production.



Immunology Support Core, Cellular Immunology Unit

Type: Core Laboratory

Summary:

"The CIU offers all the study organization and technical expertise developed at the Louis Picker Lab to researchers whose questions require obtaining and processing monkey immunological samples, and/or utilizing cytometry to assay phenotype of CFC/ICS information." The CIU was originally developed as part of the Bill & Melinda Gates foundation CAVD (Collaboration for AIDS Vaccine Discovery) consortium.



Immunology Support Core, Flow Cytometry Unit

Type: Core Laboratory

Summary:

The mission of the Immunology Support Core (ISC) is to develop and provide a wide range of state-of-the-art services, assays, and training in support of NIH-sponsored immunology research involving nonhuman primates (NHP).



In Vivo Optical Imaging Center

Type: Core Laboratory

Summary:

The IOIC is located in Cardiac Imaging Laboratory on the first floor of the Biomedical Research Building (BRB). The laboratory was established through a Shared Instrument Grant (PI: Michael Deininger) but is maintained through user fees. The core facility includes the IVIS Spectrum optical imaging camera housed in a light-tight housing, rat and mouse imaging platforms for multi-subject simultaneous acquisition, an integrated inhaled anesthesia system, and advanced analysis software. A key component of the IOIC is the ability to operate either independently or under the guidance and supervision of core personnel. Independent use of the system requires that investigators undergo training that is offered every 2 months or on an ad hoc basis. All analysis will be charged on an hourly basis and is graduated according to the level of service (independent or supervised).



Intracranial Hypertension Registry

Type: Center

Summary:

The Intracranial Hypertension Registry is a joint project of the Casey Eye Institute at Oregon Health & Science University and the Intracranial Hypertension Research Foundation of Vancouver, Washington.

"By facilitating access to detailed, comprehensive information about large numbers of IH patients, the IH Registry strives to stimulate IH research; enhance the quality of research findings; promote the development of new diagnostic and treatment modalities; support clinical trials and highlight the importance of IH in the competition for research dollars. Access to clinical trials also gives patients an opportunity to directly contribute to better quality of care."



Intracranial Hypertension Registry Foundation

Type: Foundation



Investigator Support and Integration Services

Type: Core Laboratory

Summary:

The mission of the Investigator Support and Integration Services (ISIS) program is to facilitate clinical and translational research at OHSU and the Portland VA Medical Center. ISIS works with these institutional partners to streamline study start-up and management processes and related administrative and compliance processes and provide pre-award and regulatory services to investigators. ISIS administers the Human Subjects Protection Program of the Clinical and Translational Research Center (CTRC) to maximize the protection of human subjects involved in OCTRI projects. The OHSU Clinical Trials Office, a unit within ISIS, provides study start-up services and negotiation of contracts for OHSU industry-sponsored clinical trials.



Jan van Santen Laboratory

Type: Laboratory

Summary:

Current research projects include several neurologically focused projects (quantitative characterization of prosody in autism, instrumental approaches to neurogenic speech disorders, automated neuropsychological assessment), as well as basic speech technology research.



Jay Wright Laboratory

Type: Laboratory

Summary:

Research in our laboratory includes microarray analysis of human and nonhuman primate cells, inmmunohistochemistry and molecular approaches to study the effects of gene transfection on steroid hormone-mediated signal transduction, and whole animal studies to study the effects of the ovary and ovarian factors on the OSE ovarian surface epithelium, and the effects of the OSE on the ovary itself.



Jim Rosenbaum laboratory

Type: Laboratory

Summary:

Dr. Rosenbaum's clinical interests include uveitis and autoimmune disease. His research interests include uveitis, cytokines, leukocyte and endothelial interactions. He currently heads the Uveitis Clinic and is the director of Inflammatory Research at OHSU. Dr. Rosenbaum is the Division Chief of Arthritis and Rheumatic Diseases. He is the Edward E. Rosenbaum Professor of Inflammatory Diseases. Dr. Rosenbaum received his medical degree in 1975 from Yale Medical School in New Haven, CT. He completed his Medicine residency and Rheumatology fellowship at Stanford Medical Center in Stanford, CA.



John Adelman laboratory

Type: Laboratory

Summary:

Small-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels (SK channels) are gated solely by intracellular Ca2+ ions and are fundamental regulators of neuronal excitability. Our laboratory cloned the SK channel family and currently focuses on two main areas.

First, we are investigating the physiological roles of SK channels in hippocampus.

Second, the laboratory is testing the hypothesis that a given subtype of SK channel can serve multiple roles in the same neuron by differential subcellular localization and interactions with distinct sets of microdomain partner proteins, forming an array of Ca2+ signaling complexes.



Jon's Primate Reproductive System Laboratory

Type: Laboratory



Jonah Sacha Laboratory

Type: Laboratory

Summary:

The Sacha Laboratory is located in the Vaccine & Gene Therapy Institute and Oregon National Primate Research Center at the Oregon Health & Science University. We are a dedicated team of scientists investigating protective immunity to retroviruses in order to develop a prophylactic HIV vaccine.



Judy Logan Laboratory

Type: Laboratory

Summary:

Research interests center around the secondary use of clinical data for research, with attention on user interfaces, underlying controlled vocabularies, and data structures.



Jungers Center for Neurosciences Research

Type: Center

Summary:

A collaborative effort of the Department of Neurology and the Vollum Institute at OHSU, the Jungers Center for Neurosciences Research is dedicated to accelerating the pace at which promising discoveries move from the laboratory to the patient’s bedside.



Karen Lyons Laboratory

Type: Laboratory

Summary:

My program of research focuses on family care experiences of chronic illness in an older adult with an emphasis on psychological and relational issues. In particular, I am very interested in balancing the needs of both members of the care dyad throughout the illness trajectory, and how incongruence between patient and family member impacts care transitions and the health and well-being of both members. I have published in the areas of family care and family relationships, most notably the interface between family and formal service use, dyadic incongruence in the care situation, the effects of changing physical and mental health on relationship quality in the care dyad, and early-warning signs in predicting long-term health, depression, and strain of Parkinson’s disease spouses. My current research examines symptom incongruence, communication, decision-making, and family relationships in both end-of-life and chronic illness contexts, involving both care dyads and couples.



Kathleen Grant Laboratory

Type: Laboratory

Summary:

Lab research interests:
-Animal models of alcohol abuse and alcoholism
-Sex differences in risk for and consequences of alcohol consumption
-Behavioral Pharmacology of alcohol
-In vivo imaging of alcohol effects on brain development of non human primates
-Genetic and behavioral datasets related to alcohol abuse and alcoholism



Kenneth Abbey Laboratory

Type: Laboratory



Knight Cancer Institute

Type: Institute



Layton Aging & Alzheimer's Disease Center

Type: Center

Summary:

Serving Oregon and the Northwest since 1989, our vision is to add life to years, not simply years to life.



Layton Aging & Alzheimer's Disease Center Education Core

Type: Core Laboratory

Summary:

The Education and Information Core of the Layton Aging & Alzheimer’s Disease Center develops and carries out a wide range of educational programs to:

* Increase public awareness and understanding of Alzheimer's Disease research,
* Aid in the recruitment of subjects for research studies, and
* Improve care and quality of life for persons with dementia and support their family caregivers.

Our educational activities include:

* Training for health care professionals which include seminars and lectures and we also provide “hands-on” experiences for medical students,
* Community education on Alzheimer's disease and related dementia disorders,
* Workshops on doctor – patient communication for families and caregivers,
* Collaboration with community organizations and groups to promote awareness of the disease and publicize research activities, a particular focus is underserved populations including rural communities and minority groups,
* Collaboration with other organizations that serve patients and families, e.g., the Alzheimer’s Association and other state and local agencies that serve the elderly and the loved ones who care for them, and
* Distribution of printed material that provides topical information on a variety of subjects related to Alzheimer’s disease and dementia and how best to provide quality of life to those with the disease.
* A newsletter, Aging & Alzheimer's Update, which is published twice per year.
The Education Core administers the Oregon Income Tax Check-off Alzheimer's Research Fund in collaboration with The Oregon Partnership for Alzheimer's Research, a community advisory committee.



Layton Alzheimer's Disease Center Biomarkers & Genetics Core Lab

Type: Core Laboratory

Summary:

In cooperation with the Data and Clinical Cores at the Layton Center, the Biomarkers and Genetics Core generates and maintains biomarker data for select biomarkers which have established roles in the characterization of subjects with or at risk of dementia. Biological markers of brain aging, dementia risk, and neurodegeneration have the potential to accelerate the identification of disease mechanisms and treatment strategies. "Biomarkers" may include genes, proteins, or other metabolites, and may be identified in DNA, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), or plasma. Apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype is generated for all research subjects. Sub-groups of subjects have other types of biomarker data. Many subjects have had genome-wide SNP data generated.

In order to foster collaborative research as well as expand resources and expertise, samples (DNA, CSF, and plasma) and data are distributed to qualified investigators worldwide. Most of these researchers are pursuing the causes and modifiers of dementia. Data and samples are collected from well characterized research subjects including the healthy elderly and dementia patients.



Layton Alzheimer's Disease Center Clinical Core

Type: Core Laboratory

Summary:

The Oregon Alzheimer’s Disease Center’s (OADC) Clinical Core program, directed by Dr. Jeffrey Kaye, performs longitudinal studies of the natural history of brain aging and Alzheimer's disease in patients and healthy control volunteers.

These studies which are performed through standardized neurological, neuro-psychological, and brain-imaging assessments are carried out in the Alzheimer's Disease and Memory Assessment Clinics as well as through community-based assessments conducted in the homes of study volunteers.

The Layton Center Neuroimaging Lab conducts brain-imaging MRI brain scans to assist in diagnosis of brain disease. Typically, MRI images are taken from three different planes. These planes are known as the coronal plane, sagittal plane and the axial plane. Each series of MRI images is named after the plane from which they were obtained.

The Clinical Core’s research is focused on preclinical and early Alzheimer’s disease (AD) yet is also poised to participate in other relevant new research as it arises. The OADC Clinical Core recruits, assesses and follows individuals from population groups at high risk for dementia such as: the healthy “oldest old”, subjects with family history of AD, and subjects with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI).

Research with underserved populations
The Oregon Alzheimer’s Disease Center also maintains two Satellite programs to enhance understanding of underserved populations:

The Klamath Exceptional Aging Project (KEAP) is a community-based study of brain aging being conducted in Klamath Falls.

The African American Dementia and Aging Project (AADAPt) s a Portland-based cohort of 100 African American seniors.



Legacy Research Institute

Type: Institute



Leslie Muldoon Laboratory

Type: Laboratory

Summary:

Dr. Muldoon has extensive background in tumor and cell biology, magnetic resonance imaging, and histological and immunological methods for assessing neurotoxicity and tumor volumetrics. She has played a central role in the analysis of chemoprotective agents against chemotherapy toxicity, and the development and imaging of brain tumor models.



Lipid-Atherosclerosis Laboratory

Type: Core Laboratory

Summary:

The OHSU Lipid Lab offers precise determination of lipids and specialized lipid metabolites not routinely available in general hospital clinical labs or elsewhere in Oregon. Currently, the OHSU Lipid Lab is the only laboratory on the West Coast that does sterols.



Lisa Coussens Laboratory

Type: Laboratory

Summary:

The Coussens lab focuses on the role of immune cells and their mediators as critical regulators of cancer development. During the early development of cancer, many physiological processes occur in the vicinity of 'young tumor cells' that are similar to processes that occur during embryonic development and to healing of wounds in adult tissue, e.g., leukocyte recruitment and activation (inflammation), angiogenesis (development of new blood supply) and tissue remodeling. During tumor development however, instead of initiating a 'healing' response, activated leukocytes provide growth-promoting factors that typically help tumors grow. We are interested in understanding the molecular and cellular mechanisms that regulate leukocyte recruitment into neoplastic tissue, and the subsequent regulation those leukocytes exert on evolving cancer cells. To address these issues, we have taken several approaches to investigate mechanisms involved in: i. induction and maintenance of chronic inflammatory microenvironments in premalignant, malignant and metastatic tissues using murine models of human cancer development, and clinical samples obtained fresh from the operating room from patients with cancer, ii. role of leukocytes in regulating tissue remodeling, angiogenesis, immune suppression and cancer development, iii. development of novel non-invasive imaging reagents to monitor immune response in tissues/tumors. The long-term goal of this work is to translate basic observations made in the mouse, toward rational design of novel therapeutics whose aim will be to block and/or alter rate-limiting events critical for solid tumor growth, maintenance or recurrence in humans, and/or therapeutics that enhance the efficacy of standard-of-care cytotoxic therapy. Currently, we are actively utilizing transgenic mouse models of solid tumor development (non-small cell lung cancer, non-melanoma squamous, pancreatic and breast adenocarcinoma, and mesothelioma) to reveal the functional roles of adaptive and innate leukocytes during tumor development. These experimental studies are conducted in parallel with evaluation of representative human cancer specimens to affirm that mechanisms revealed in the experimental setting represent fundamental parameters of multi-stage cancer development in humans.



MRI Support Core Laboratory

Type: Core Laboratory

Summary:

The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) core provides ONPRC investigators with equipment and assistance to perform MRI exams of sedated NHP subjects.



Mark Slifka Laboratory

Type: Laboratory

Summary:

Mark Slifka and his colleagues are investigating the underlying mechanisms of humoral and cell-mediated immunity against acute and chronic viral infections. This work has included developing several models of viral infection and/or vaccination in order to address basic immunological questions related to the development and maintenance of long-term protective immunity. We have also developed a series of clinical studies in which we study immunological memory directly in human subjects. During the course of this work, we study a number of viruses including arenaviruses (lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, LCMV), alphaviruses (chikungunya virus), flaviviruses (West Nile virus, yellow fever, and dengue), and orthopoxviruses (vaccinia, cowpox, and monkeypox). Several of these viruses cause encephalitis or meningitis (e.g., LCMV, West Nile Virus, and vaccine strains of yellow fever virus) and one of our goals is to develop better vaccines against encephalitic viruses. The combination of basic research in animal models and applied research in clinical studies involving both healthy and immunocompromised populations has provided the opportunity to better define the requirements for immunological memory and to learn how to develop more effective diagnostics and vaccine candidates.

These experiments lay the foundation for future studies in which Slifka and team members will develop new antiviral vaccines and determine the mechanisms involved with building strong vaccine-induced immunity. For instance, these scientists have recently discovered a new hydrogen peroxide-based approach to vaccine production that results in a safer, more effective vaccine preparation that can be used to create better human and animal vaccines.



Mary Zelinski Laboratory

Type: Laboratory



Massively Parallel Sequencing Shared Resource

Type: Core Laboratory

Summary:

The OHSU Massively Parallel Sequencing Shared Resource (MPSSR) was founded in 2009 with the mission of providing high quality, cost efficient short read sequencing services. The intent of the MPSSR is to offer state of the art sequencing for a variety of protocols - including genome resequencing, transcriptome analysis, miRNA analysis, and prometer analysis via ChIP-seq. The goal of the MPSSR is to help investigators examine the genetic profiles that underlie disease predisposition and to explore the fundamental operations of biological systems.



Metabolic Disease Working Group

Type: Consortium

Summary:

"The focus of the Metabolic Disease Working Group headed by Kevin Grove (Neuroscience) and Charles Roberts (Neuroscience/ Reproductive Sciences) is to develop and use nonhuman primate models of diet-induced obesity to study the broad health issues associated with metabolic diseases, including obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and immune disorders.

Obesity is a worldwide health epidemic, being a major contributor to the increased occurrence of coronary heart disease, hypertension, immune disorders and type-2 diabetes. Sixty to ninety percent of type-2 diabetes is thought to result from obesity, and obesity is a component of the metabolic syndrome, which also includes cardiovascular risk factors and symptoms of pre-diabetes such as impaired glucose tolerance. A successful understanding of the causes, consequences, and possible solutions to the metabolic disease crisis will require that the full spectrum of basic, translational, and clinical research and epidemiology be brought to bear on the problem. The nonhuman primate is one of the few models that develops the full spectrum of the metabolic syndrome and has several aspects that make it a critical and powerful model for the human disease."

From: http://www.ohsu.edu/xd/research/centers-institutes/onprc/scientific-discovery/working-groups.cfm



Methamphetamine Abuse Research Center

Type: Center

Summary:

Our mission at the MARC is to understand methamphetamine abuse at many levels: "To characterize the effects of methamphetamine use and withdrawal at the molecular, neurochemical, anatomical, behavioral, and clinical levels, and to identify obstacles to recovery in methamphetamine abusers."

Technically, the MARC is a P-50 research center funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), an agency of the federal government that sponsors much of the addictions research that happens in the United States. The MARC was founded in 2006 when a group of neuroscience researchers and doctors at OHSU and the Portland VA Medical Center decided they wanted to work together to study the many interacting facets of the disease. At OHSU, the center is jointly housed with the departments of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neuroscience.
Translational research

"Translational research" involves looking at a single problem from many different directions and at many different levels. For example, we might look at the issue of drug craving by talking with addicts about their experiences, viewing their brains through an MRI scanner, observing mice who have become addicted to drugs, or using cultured cells to look at neurotransmitter receptors affected by drug molecules. Investigating neurobiological questions at these multiple levels makes research more powerful, since each level or technique has different insights to offer.



Methamphetamine Abuse Research Center Animal Core Component

Type: Core Laboratory

Summary:

Three of the MARC's research components (5, 6, and 8) include experiments with lines of mice bred to have special genetic traits. The animal core supports these components by purchasing, testing, breeding, maintaining, and distributing these animals within the center.

The core will breed special mouse lines F1 and F2 that are descendents of C57BL/6J (B6) and DBA/2J (D2) inbred strains. For Components 5 and 6, the animal core will also produce independent sets of replicated mouse lines selected for high and low tendencies toward methamphetamine drinking and for high and low methamphetamine-induced sensitization.

In addition, the core is developing new behavioral-testing procedures and maintaining a database that will track individual animals and post their trait data for all MARC investigators to utilize.



Michael Aziz Laboratory

Type: Laboratory



Michael Liskay Laboratory

Type: Laboratory



Michiko Nakano Laboratory

Type: Laboratory

Summary:

Research interests include: Anaerobiosis of Bacillus subtilis; oxygen-controlled gene regulation; two-component signal transduction system; transcriptional activation; nitrate/nitrite reductases; flavohemoglobin; anaerobic electron transport; nitric oxide signaling.



Mitch Turker Laboratory

Type: Laboratory

Summary:

I am interested in the mechanisms of abnormal gene inactivation and the relevance of these events to cancer. Abnormal gene inactivation results from two distinct types of events. The first is DNA mutation, which represents a change in the structure of DNA that alters expression of a given gene. The second type of event is epigenetic silencing, which involves loss of gene expression without alteration of the gene sequence. With regards to mutational events, we are interested in both endogenous and exogenous genotoxins that can affect the frequency and types of mutations that occur within the animal. A current focus is on how accelerated particles in space cause large-scale genomic damage that could affect astronauts during prolonged space travel. Our work with epigenetic silencing focuses on how silencing is initiated and determining the pathways that cause active genes to become aberrantly turned off.



Molecular Diagnostic Center

Type: Center

Summary:

The OHSU Molecular Diagnostic Center provides DNA based testing for diagnosis, carrier detection, and prenatal diagnosis of many genetic diseases. All current molecular genetic technologies including Southern blotting, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) and DNA sequencing techniques are utilized. These accurate tests are reasonable in cost and require only a blood sample, therefore offering many advantages in the evaluation of patients requiring any of the above. All tests are performed using stringent clinical protocols, assuring prompt turnaround of results. All reports include quantitative predictions of risk based on DNA data and other clinical findings. A board certified clinical molecular geneticist and a board certified clinical medical geneticist report abnormal results directly to the referring physician and discuss interpretation. Immediate final reports are communicated by telephone or FAX transmission.



Molecular Virology Support Core

Type: Core Laboratory

Summary:

The overall goal of the Molecular Virology Support Core (MVSC) is to advance the efforts of the Oregon National Primate Research Center (ONPRC), the Vaccine and Gene Therapy Institute (VGTI), and collaborative research programs focused on nonhuman primate (NHP) infectious disease models and those using viral vectors as tools to modify genes or deliver macromolecules through provision of expertise, reagents, standardized assays, and training in the use of infectious viral agents in their research programs.



Molecular and Cellular Biology Core Laboratory

Type: Core Laboratory

Summary:

The Molecular and Cellular Biology Core provides services, reagents and training for all aspects of molecular biology and cell culture. Services include DNA sequencing, real-time PCR, genotyping, robotic RNA and DNA purification, monkey-specific cDNAs, and customized media and buffers for cell culture. The core also produces lentiviral vectors for cDNA and shRNA delivery. Core personnel assist researchers in maintaining and storing cell lines. The core makes available state-of-the-art equipment, including a 969capillary DNA sequencer, realtime qRT-PCR platforms, and fluorometers for cell-based kinetic analyses..



Monoclonal Antibody Core Laboratory

Type: Core Laboratory

Summary:

The VGTI Monoclonal Core offers two basic services: the generation of new monoclonal antibodies and the scaleup production and purification of antibody from existing cell lines (a stand -alone phase IV).



Neuropathology Core

Type: Core Laboratory

Summary:

The Neuropathology Core of the Layton Center for Aging and Alzheimer’s Disease Center is dedicated to studying, through autopsy, the brains of individuals who have been followed longitudinally in the Oregon Alzheimer’s Disease Center Clinical Core.

Requests for tissue from the Oregon Brain Bank should be directed to Dr. Randall Woltjer. Dr. Woltjer will be glad to communicate with investigators regarding their tissue needs and to assist them in identifying suitable materials for their studies. Material Transfer Agreements between the requesting and sending institutions are needed before shipment.



Nonhuman Primate Reagent Resource

Type: Institute

Summary:

The mission of the Nonhuman Primate Reagent Resource is to facilitate the optimal use of nonhuman primate models in biomedical research by identifying, developing, characterizing and producing reagents for monitoring or modulating immune responses.

We distribute unique, non-human primate-specific antibodies for in vitro diagnostics. We also develop and produce primate recombinant antibodies for in vivo cell depletion or modulating immune responses. The Reagent Resource develops and maintains nonhuman primate reference cell lines and immunoglobulins, and is developing anti-Ig reagents for macaque monkeys and other primate species.



Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Core Facility

Type: Core Laboratory

Summary:

A facility that uses a state-of-the-art NMR spectrometer to verify or determine the structure of organic molecules. Housed in the Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, it is designed to exploit the power of designed small molecules as probes of protein and cellular function and to provide the foundation for the development of prototypic therapeutic agents.



OHSU Center for Women's Health

Type: Center

Summary:

For more than a decade, we have been improving the way that you and thousands of women in Oregon, and beyond, access and experience health care.

You can count on our medical experts for your care today and through every stage of your life. Our doctors, nurses, researchers, social workers and support staff are all highly qualified, sensitive to your needs and honored to be trusted partners for you and your family.



Ontology Development Group

Type: Academic Department

Summary:

The OHSU ontology development group is an interdisciplinary group lead by Assistant Professors Dr. Carlo Torniai and Dr. Melissa Haendel. An ontology is a formal representation about a set of concepts and relationships between those concepts within a given domain. Ontologies are developed in many different domains, but share four common goals: 1) Represent what is known, 2) Infer what is not otherwise obvious, 3) promote the discovery of new insights from exploration and manipulation of complex data and 4) provide context and intuitive navigation during the exploration process.

The Ontology Development Group was brought together at the OHSU Library to build ontologies for the eagle-i resource discovery platform (eagle-i.net). The group contributes to ontology development within the context of the Open Biological Ontologies Foundry consortium of ontologies, and participates in a diversity of projects to represent knowledge and analyze data in biomedicine. Our research is currently directed towards ontological representation of persons and their roles and expertise in research, biological specimens and pathological anatomy, reagents and cell lines, cross-species anatomy, best practices for use of ontologies in software applications and publication of Linked Open Data, and ontology reuse and interoperability.

The OHSU Ontology Development Group serves the OHSU research community in support of their data management and analysis needs.



Oregon Center for Aging and Technology

Type: Center

Summary:

The Center fosters and stimulates translational innovation through a number of mechanisms including its multi-disciplinary, multi-institutional Council composed of academic, community and industry leaders, building new national and international research collaborations, providing support to existing research studies, as well as developmental support through the ORCATECH Living Laboratory.



Oregon Clinical & Translational Research Institute

Type: Institute



Oregon Clinical & Translational Research Institute Bionutrition Unit

Type: Core Laboratory

Summary:

The Bionutrition Unit provides nutrition, body composition, and energy expenditure services. Bionutritionist and research kitchen staff are highly experienced and trained to assist investigators with the design and implementation of research meals, feeding studies, and related research. The Bionutrition Unit also provides a variety of energy expenditure and body composition measurement services using a range of equipment.



Oregon Clinical & Translational Research Institute Core Laboratory

Type: Core Laboratory

Summary:

The OCTRI Core Laboratory is specifically designed and equipped to perform both basic and specialized research assays and sample processing in support of translational research studies and trials. Laboratory staff have extensive experience in the performance of a wide variety of analytical and genetic based assays and procedures.



Oregon Health & Science University Library

Type: Library

Summary:

The OHSU Library advances the discovery of knowledge by providing access to relevant, quality information. OHSU librarians are active participants in education, research, outreach and healthcare.



Oregon Health & Science University Research Funding & Development Services

Type: Center

Summary:

Welcome to Research Funding & Development Services. We're a central resource to help investigators at Oregon Health and Science University find funding, assess funding strategy, and write better grants.



Oregon National Primate Research Center

Type: Center

Summary:

As one of the eight National Primate Research Centers in the United States, our mandate as a Center is to provide Nonhuman Primate (NHP) resources for the very best scientific programs, both within the Oregon Health & Science University community and beyond.



Oregon Stem Cell Center

Type: Center

Summary:

The Oregon Stem Cell Center conducts basic and applied research in the field of Stem Cell Biology with the long term goal to harness the properties of stem cells for regenerative medicine and cell therapy.

The Oregon Stem Cell Center was created on January 1, 2004 and is directed by Markus Grompe, M.D. The center is housed on the top (7th) floor of the Biomedical Research Building. In 2009, the center administratively became part of the Papé Family Pediatric Research Institute.

The OSCC has 3 cores, a monoclonal antibody production core, a cell sorting core and a cell isolation core. Philip Streeter, Ph.D. is the director of these core laboratories. The main goal of the cores is to generate novel reagents for the isolation of stem cells and their differentiated offspring by generating monoclonal antibodies directed against cell surface antigens of living cells. The cell sorting core uses a state-of-the-art Cytopeia high speed InFlux instrument and is capable of sorting large and fragile cells without loss of viability. The cell isolation core will provide cell isolations services including tissue procurement and protease digestion of these tissues.



Oregon Stem Cell Center Monoclonal Antibody Core

Type: Core Laboratory

Summary:

The Oregon Stem Cell Center Monoclonal Antibody Core is focused on developing monoclonal antibodies that aid investigators in the identification and isolation of novel stem and progenitor cell populations. To enable isolation of live stem cells, personnel within the Monoclonal Antibody Core develop monoclonal antibodies directed against cell surface antigens. Personnel within the laboratory are highly skilled in all aspects of monoclonal antibody generation and characterization, and work closely with investigators throughout the entire immunization, fusion, and screening process. The monoclonal antibody core offers a full complement of services related to the development of monoclonal antibodies.



Owen McCarty Laboratory

Type: Laboratory

Summary:

Dr. McCarty's research is focused on understanding the interplay between cell biology and fluid mechanics in the cardiovascular system. In particular, his research into the balance between hydrodynamic shear forces and chemical adhesive interactions has great relevance to underlying processes of cancer, cardiovascular disease, and inflammation.



Pacific Northwest Evidence-based Practice Center

Type: Center

Summary:

The Pacific Northwest Evidence-based Practice Center (EPC) conducts systematic reviews of health care topics for federal and state agencies, professional associations, and foundations. These reviews report the evidence from clinical research studies and the quality of that evidence for use by clinicians, employers, policymakers, researchers, and others in making decisions about the provision of health care services and health research. Reports may be used to inform the development of clinical practice guidelines, or to inform reimbursement and coverage policies. The Center is one of 11 EPCs sponsored by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ).

Investigators with the Pacific Northwest EPC have a particular interest in diagnostic technology assessment, prevention effectiveness, evidence-based informatics, research in managed care, and critical appraisal of cost-effectiveness analysis and decision analysis. In the past, faculty affiliated with the Center have investigated areas such as hepatitis C, pressure ulcers, acute head injury, pain management, drug effectiveness, thyroid function tests, cancer screening, diagnostic use of upper GI endoscopy, asthma diagnosis and management, telemedicine, menopausal symptoms, osteoporosis, vaginal birth after cesarean section, and statewide trauma systems. The Pacific Northwest EPC is housed in the Department of Medical Informatics & Clinical Epidemiology, OHSU School of Medicine, with partners at the University of Washington CHASE Alliance in Seattle, and Spectrum Research, Inc., in Tacoma, Washington.



Paul Cordo Laboratory

Type: Laboratory

Summary:

Coordinated muscular contraction and movement is one of the primary functions of the central nervous system (CNS). Sensory information from several sensory systems is integrated with learned motor patterns to guide the limbs, head and trunk through space. The research carried out in my laboratory focuses on how the kinematics of movement are represented in sensory input and how this input is used by the CNS to coordinate muscle contraction. Accordingly, the experimental techniques employed in our studies include electrophysiology at the single neuron level, stimulution of sensory receptors with vibration, biomechanics and motor behavior--all carried out with human subjects. Most research carried out in my laboratory is basic, i.e., investigating sensorimotor control mechanisms, although a portion of our effort is focused on related areas of clinical research (e.g., stroke rehabilitation).



Paul Spellman Laboratory

Type: Laboratory

Summary:

The Spellman Lab is interested in using genetic, genomic, and proteomic data to understand and model the biology of cancer and to develop methods to effectively deploy therapeutic agents in the age of molecularly guided medicine.

Members of the lab use a combination of conventional molecular biology, high throughput genomic and proteomic assays, and bioinformatic analyses in their work.



Paula Amato Laboratory

Type: Laboratory



Pediatric Clinical and Translational Research Center

Type: Center

Summary:

The mission of the Pediatric Clinical and Translational Research Center (PCTRC) is to improve child health by providing a dedicated inpatient and outpatient research unit in Doernbecher Children's Hospital.

The Pediatric Clinical and Translational Research Center offers:

Inpatient nursing services in the 10N section of Doernbecher Children's Hospital
Outpatient nursing services in Doernbecher Children's Hospital
Pediatric RN study coordinators
Bionutrition services

The Pediatric Clinical and Translational Research Center (PCTRC) was opened in July 2008 and is a collaboration among OCTRI, Doernbecher Children's Hospital and Foundation, and the OHSU Department of Pediatrics. OCTRI supports investigators from a wide variety of disciplines who conduct child health research.



Peta Grigsby Laboratory

Type: Laboratory

Summary:

Dr. Grigsby's research program has evolved through expanded multidisciplinary collaboration among clinician scientists with neonatology and pediatric specialties and basic scientists with expertise in microbiology, reproductive immunology, pathology and cardiovascular physiology. In this regard, her field of research has expanded from preterm birth studies to now include studies on placental development and fetal growth. This research initiative seeks to understand the ability of the developing placental to respond to an adverse in utero environment and to determine the mechanisms underlying placental plasticity which are at the root of the Developmental Origins of Adult Disease phenomenon.



Peter Barr-Gillespie Laboratory

Type: Laboratory

Summary:

We study mechanotransduction by hair cells, the sensory cells of the inner ear. Being interested in what molecules make up the transduction apparatus, the collection of channels, linker molecules, and motors that mediate transduction, we take a frank reductionist approach. We start with physiology: when you mechanically stimulate a hair cell, what are the characteristics of the resulting receptor current? Studying transduction currents, we learn how transduction channels open and close in response to mechanical forces, and how the adaptation motor responds to sustained forces and allows channels to close. These experiments have suggested candidate families for the transduction channel and the adaptation motors, for example, and we use these clues to identify, clone, and characterize the responsible molecules. Because the scarcity of hair cells prevent extensive biochemical characterization, we express transduction molecules in vitro and determine properties that can be compared with the physiology of transduction. This approach has proven highly successful for identification of the adaptation motor, myosin-1c; the tip link, cadherin-23; and the calcium pump, PMCA2a.

Recently, we have applied proteomics techniques to every aspect of the lab's research program. Modern mass spectrometry is remarkably comprehensive in its ability to identify and quantify molecules and has the sensitivity to detect scarce hair-bundle proteins.

Now that we know the several hundred most abundant proteins of the hair bundle, we can begin to dissect how the hair bundle is assembled during development. Moreover, our knowledge of several proteins of the transduction complex, together with the sensitivity of mass spectrometry, allows us to take a biochemical approach to identification of the transduction channel, one of the central mysteries of the auditory system.



Peter Zuber laboratory

Type: Laboratory

Summary:

Research interests include "regulation of prokaryotic gene expression and development in response to stress; signal transduction; regulation and mechanism of peptide antibiotic biosynthesis; regulation of genetic competence in Bacillus subtilis."



Point-of-Care Engineering Laboratory

Type: Laboratory

Summary:

The goal of the Point-of-Care Engineering Laboratory at OHSU is to develop approaches and technologies that allow early detection and remediation of physical and cognitive decline.

Our interests include:

* Technologies to aid evaluation and remediation of neurological disorders
* Assistive technologies for helping the elderly remain independent
* Modeling of cognitive and motor changes
* Development of unobtrusive sensor technologies
* Integrated management of clinical and sensor data

Research in this lab uses a multitude of engineering approaches, including multi-resolutional signal processing, sophisticated statistical analyses, modeling of physical behaviors of sensors, and computational models of cognitive behaviors. Research spans sensor development to algorithm development to clinical field studies.

The Point of Care Laboratory at OHSU is headed by Misha Pavel, Ph.D. This laboratory also provides the engineering arm of the Oregon Royal Center for Aging and Technology.



Portland Alcohol Research Center

Type: Center

Summary:

The center supports the coordinated research efforts of 20 scientists at the VA and OHSU, and one scientist at the University of Pittsburgh, in areas ranging from behavioral neuroscience to molecular biology. A major emphasis of the research is using animal models to study the genetic contributions to alcohol and drug sensitivity. The PARC is focused on the genetics of how the brain adapts to alcohol. Genetic mapping techniques have allowed a large group of investigators collaboratively to identify the location of individual genes affecting responses to alcohol in mice. The PARC is unique in its focus on gene mapping and discovering the function of many such genes relevant for how the brain responds to chronic alcohol.



Portland Shriners Research Center

Type: Center



Portland VA Medical Center

Type: Hospital



Primate Pathology Laboratory

Type: Laboratory

Summary:

The Pathology Services Unit (PSU) provides clinical and anatomic pathology support for disease diagnosis and surveillance for ONPRC’s animal resources.



Program in Molecular & Cellular Biosciences

Type: Consortium

Summary:

We are the largest graduate program at OHSU. PMCB is the portal to Ph.D. thesis research in five basic science departments. Our internationally acclaimed PhD and MD faculty have primary appointments in the five participating basic science departments, and also include faculty from The Vollum Institute, Heart Research Center, Vaccine and Gene Therapy Institute, Oregon National Primate Center, Center for Research on Occupational and Environmental Toxicology, Cancer Center, Shriner’s Hospital for Crippled Children, Casey Eye Institute, Vaccine and Gene Therapy Institute, Oregon Hearing Research Institute, U.S. Veteran's Affairs Medical Institute, Advanced Imaging Research Center, and the Center for Weight Regulation.

We admit between 12-25 students a year into our program. Our graduate students are a diverse and interactive group who come from all over the United States and the world. They carry out PhD thesis research in a wide range of laboratories, from those that focus on basic biological questions to those labs that focus on disease processes and translational research. Students can pursue interdisciplinary interests across departmental boundaries in areas including the autonomic nervous system, cancer biology, chemical biology, developmental biology, endocrinology, gene regulation, immunology, inflammatory processes, metabolism, microbial pathogenesis, signal transduction, structural biology, and virology.



Proteomics Shared Resource Core Laboratory

Type: Core Laboratory

Summary:

The OHSU Protemics Shared Resource facility was established to make state-of-the-art mass spectrometry based protein analysis analytical capabilities available to the biomedical research community at OHSU.



Radiological Society of North America

Type: Association



Research Cytogenetics Core Laboratory

Type: Core Laboratory

Summary:

A fee-for-service cytogentics laboratory available to genetics researchers to assist in development and execution of cytogenetics experiments for research purposes. Through rigorous standardization of protocols and customized experiment development, the OHSU Research Cytogenetics Core Laboratory provides high quality metaphase and interphase cytogenetic data to the OHSU research community. Services are also available to non-profit and commercial investigators located in Oregon and elsewhere.



Research Development & Administration, Oregon Health & Science University

Type: Technology Transfer Office



Research Navigator Group

Type: Center

Summary:

The OCTRI Research Navigator Group is the initial point of contact to connect investigators with OCTRI resources and services. OCTRI services are available to investigators at all phases of a research project from protocol development, grant submissions, study contact, data analysis and publication. The Navigators provide high-quality, efficient and knowledgeable assistance to guide investigators to the appropriate OCTRI resources to meet the individual project needs.



Richard Stouffer Laboratory

Type: Laboratory

Summary:

"Richard Stouffer and his associates investigate the factors controlling the growth and ovulation of the mature follicle at midcycle, as well as development of the corpus luteum from the ovulatory follicle and its function until the end of the menstrual cycle or into early pregnancy. Studies on intact monkeys and research on isolated ovarian tissues and cells are unraveling the complex interaction between substances produced within the ovary (e.g., progesterone and angiogenic factors) and those coming from other organs (gonadotropins from the pituitary gland and placenta) in controlling the ovulatory follicle and corpus luteum.

Stouffer's discovery that progesterone-producing cells within the ovulatory follicle and corpus luteum also contain progesterone receptors led to research identifying an essential role for this steroid hormone within the ovary for follicle rupture and release of the egg, and for development of the corpus luteum. Additional studies are identifying the angiogenic factors (e.g., vascular endothelial growth factor, angiopoietin) that promote the unique development of blood vessels in the adult ovary during the menstrual cycle, and whether aberrant production of these factors is a cause of infertility disorders or side effects during assisted reproductive protocols. These investigations led to ongoing studies in collaboration with other researchers to evaluate the potential of antiprogestins, antiangiogenic agents and inhibitors of oocyte maturation or ovulation as contraceptives in preclinical trials on nonhuman primates.

Stouffer's group is also working with the Assisted Reproductive Technologies (ART) Laboratory and a multi-center Oncofertility Consortium to elucidate the hormonal and local factors critical for normal, timely development of the primate ovarian follicle and its enclosed egg.

This research is directly relevant to continued efforts to improve the clinical approaches to treating infertility and high-risk pregnancy, and to develop new methods of contraception. New information will also aid in the preservation of nonhuman primates through assisted reproductive techniques, such as in vitro fertilization."

Additionally, the Stouffer Lab studies the effects of androgens and Western-style diet on ovarian and uterine function, as part of the Specialized Cooperative Centers Program in Reproduction and Infertility Research (SCCPIR).



Robert Bennett Laboratory

Type: Laboratory

Summary:

Dr. Bennett is Professor of Medicine and Nursing at Oregon Health and Science University (OHSU) in Portland, Oregon.



Robert Lowe Laboratory

Type: Laboratory

Summary:

Dr. Lowe conducts health services and clinical epidemiology research in several content areas, reflecting his clinical background as an emergency physician. He has published extensively on the relationship between emergency department use and access to primary care, especially among vulnerable populations. Currently-funded projects include a community-based participatory research project in partnership with Central City Concern; a multi-center consortium conducting clinical trials on treatment of neurological emergencies , and a study on the implementation of electronic medical records in small, rural primary care practices.



Robert Steiner Laboratory

Type: Laboratory



Rosalie Sears Laboratory

Type: Laboratory

Summary:

We are studying cellular signaling pathways involved in the generation of human cancer. In general, disruption of these pathways alters the ability of a cell to control its proliferation as well as the initiation of programmed cell death (apoptosis). We are focusing on three key signaling pathways that regulate both cellular proliferation and apoptosis: the Myc transcription factor, the Ras signaling protein, and the G1 cyclin dependent kinase (Cdk)/retinoblastoma(Rb)/E2F pathway. While each of these pathways has been extensively studied over the past decade, the nature of their interrelations remains elusive. Since these pathways are deregulated in the majority of all human tumors, we want to understand how they network and synergize to precisely control cellular proliferation versus cell death. This information will contribute to our understanding of the complex nature of cancer progression, and facilitate the generation of meaningful therapies.



Sandra Rugonyi Laboratory

Type: Laboratory

Summary:

Dr. Rugonyi's main research interests include the analysis of biological systems, and the development of mathematical and computational models that describe them. Finite element methods and other numerical techniques, when used with appropriate physically-based models, provide a means of calculating and visualizing the response of systems to different conditions. Dr. Rugonyi's current research is mainly on the study of cardiovascular systems, which includes the analysis of blood flow through vessels and the heart, as well as the interaction of flow with tissue.



School of Dentistry

Type: School



School of Medicine

Type: School

Summary:

The OHSU School of Medicine is a vibrant community of educators, students, scientists, clinicians and others working side-by-side to heal, teach, discover and serve. We are proud of our uniquely collaborative and collegial environment.

Our faculty is dedicated to preparing physicians for the medical, ethical and humanistic responsibilities of their calling, while also providing outstanding care to patients from Oregon and elsewhere.

Along with the art of teaching and healing comes the responsibility for discovery. The School of Medicine faculty is widely recognized nationally and internationally for the pursuit of new knowledge in a breadth of investigative areas ranging from molecular biology and cancer to heart disease, behavioral science and issues of public health.

The importance of the work of our physicians and scientists in this century grows by the year as opportunities increase for new knowledge, for better disease treatment, and for a health care system that provides for the needs of the individual in a manner that is affordable and available to all.

OHSU and its School of Medicine are committed to meeting the health professions and science education, biomedical research and health care needs of the people and the state we have been proud to serve for more than 100 years.



School of Nursing, Oregon Health & Science University

Type: School



Sergio Ojeda Laboratory

Type: Laboratory

Summary:

Sergio Ojeda and his collaborators seek to understand the process by which the brain controls the initiation of mammalian puberty. An important goal in their laboratory is to gain insights into the molecular and genetic mechanisms underlying deranged sexual development, particularly sexual precocity and delayed puberty of cerebral origin. Ojeda's team focuses on identifying molecules responsible for the interactions that occur between neurons and glial cells in the hypothalamus, a region in the base of the brain that controls several bodily functions, including hormone secretion, reproduction, response to stress, feeding and sex behavior. One group of hypothalamic neurons produces gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), a substance that controls the secretion of reproductive hormones from the pituitary gland.

The investigators are using cellular, molecular, genetics and systems biology strategies, in addition to high-throughput approaches and computational biology methods to develop three interrelated concepts: 1) That mammalian puberty is controlled by genetic networks that, operating within different cell contexts in the neuroendocrine brain, coordinate the activity of GnRH neurons at puberty, 2) That these networks are controlled at the transcriptional level by a repressive mechanism exerted by discrete subsets of gene "silencers", and 3) That this transcriptional regulation is under epigenetic control, i.e. a mechanism by which environmental factors (such as nutrition, man-made chemicals, changes in light/dark cycle, etc.) regulate gene activity without modifying the actual sequence of encoding DNA.



Shaun Morrison Laboratory

Type: Laboratory

Summary:

The Morrison lab's research uses electrophysiological and anatomical approaches to understand the functional organization, rhythmicities, developmental influences and pharmacology of the CNS circuits that regulate the sympathetic outflows controlling variables critical for homeostasis such as body temperature, energy expenditure, blood glucose, blood pressure, cardiac output and plasma catecholamines.



Society for the Advancement of Women’s Imaging

Type: Association



Stanford Center for Biomedical Informatics Research

Type: Center



Steven Jacques Laboratory

Type: Laboratory

Summary:

Prof. Jacques and his team are interested in biomedical optics and laser-tissue interactions. Additionally, their work involves the development of diagnostic and therapeutic devices for medicine and biology using optical technologies.



Steven Kohama Laboratory

Type: Laboratory



Suzanne Mitchell Laboratory

Type: Laboratory

Summary:

Individuals who have a history of drug use are more impulsive than individuals who do not have such a history. My research examines whether this difference existed prior to drug use, or is a consequence of the neuroadaptations due to drug use. To address these questions, we work with human, rat and mouse subjects. For example, we examine whether different genotypes are associated with impulsive behavior by comparing impulsivity in drug-naïve selected lines and inbred strains of mice and rats. Also we examine whether different levels of impulsivity predict responses the first time mice and rats are exposed to drugs of abuse, like alcohol, nicotine and methamphetamine. Measures of impulsivity in human subjects are used to examine whether acute exposure to drugs of abuse or withdrawal form use results in changes in behavior. In addition, my research examines the basic neural processes involved in decision making, including impulsive and risky decision making, using lesion techniques and imaging.



Tania Vu Laboratory

Type: Laboratory

Summary:

We develop and apply imaging nanotechnologies to study cellular signaling in health and disease.

Our basic research thrust is to develop molecular-scale quantitative imaging tools to understand the spatiotemporal dynamics of cellular signaling in the nervous system. Our applied research thrust is to develop new technologies to identify and assess drug effectiveness in cancer and neurodegenerative diseases.



Tom Gregory Laboratory

Type: Laboratory

Summary:

Areas of special interest include the hormonal effects on pelvic floor connective tissue, epidemiology of pelvic floor dysfunction, and pelvic floor injury.



Transgenic Mouse Model Shared Resource

Type: Core Laboratory

Summary:

Currently, the transgenic facility is generating transgenic and knock-out mice, cryopreserving mouse embryos as well as performing various other services. We are available for consultations and providing letters of support to investigators.



Translational Clinical Trials Center Reading Center

Type: Center

Summary:

Housed within Casey Eye Institute is the Translational Clinical Trials Center Reading Center (TCTC RC), which has a collection of talented physicians and staff who are focused on preclinical evaluation, clinical trial design and endpoint development of outcome measurements. Our center can offer expertise in quality control and provide analysis of data collected.



Vaccine & Gene Therapy Institute

Type: Institute



Vivek Unni Laboratory

Type: Laboratory

Summary:

Dr. Unni has a special interest in taking care of people with Parkinson’s Disease and other disorders of movement. He has specific training in both the patient-care side and research aspects of these disorders. He enjoys treating people with these types of problems and working to make their lives better using the kind of team approach that is possible at OHSU.



Vollum Institute

Type: Institute

Summary:

The Vollum Institute is dedicated to basic research focusing on gene regulation, structural biology, cell signaling, molecular neuroscience and synaptic modulation with implications for human diseases ranging from autism and other neurodevelopmental disorders to Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, psychiatric diseases and mechanisms of drug addiction.



Wassana Yantasee Laboratory

Type: Laboratory

Summary:

Our research program employs functionalized nanomaterials in biomedical devices and medicine. Our laboratory is a part of the Department of Biomedical Engineering, Oregon Health Science University (OHSU) School of Medicine. Our research involves development of animal models of kidney and metal-related diseases and applying the nanomaterials to diagnose, prevent, or treat such diseases.



Women's Health Research Unit

Type: Laboratory



Xubo Song Laboratory

Type: Laboratory

Summary:

Research interests broadly include machine learning and computer vision areas with the main focus on medical image registration and analysis.



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